Community Dementia Education Resources

A series of resources are available for available for Black/African American and Latinx/Hispanic communities in Washington state to download and use for dementia education and community awareness. They're free and available for local partners, faith-based organizations, healthcare providers, media outlets and everyone else.

The Washington State Department of Health is actively working to develop materials that are tailored to different communities in our state and will continue to add more materials as resources are available. 

Videos


If you need the raw video files instead, please contact us and we will be happy to share them with you.

 

Understanding Memory Loss - 0:33 (YouTube)

Understanding Memory Loss Spokesperson Connie Thompson - 2:14 (YouTube)

Understanding Memory Loss Spokesperson George Dicks - 2:29 (YouTube)

Brochures
Newsletter Articles

Black/African American Community

Social Media Graphics

Click an image to download it.

Post copy: Early detection can make a big difference if you have dementia. Your health care provider can tell you about lifestyle changes or medications that could help. And there are many resources and programs to support individuals and families. If you notice memory loss in yourself or a relative, it's time to talk with your family and your health care provider. Learn more at doh.wa.gov/memory.


Post copy: If you or a family member has signs of memory loss, now is the time to talk about it. Listen carefully to each other, with compassion. And agree on your next steps together, starting with a call to your health care provider for an appointment. Learn more at doh.wa.gov/memory.


Post copy: Some memory loss is just part of aging. But memory loss that disrupts daily life could be a sign of something more serious and should be checked out by your health care provider. Don't ignore signs of memory loss or new problems related to thinking, whether they're in yourself or a family member. Learn more about possible signs of dementia at doh.wa.gov/memory.


Post copy: If you or a family member has memory loss or signs of dementia, you're not alone. But it's important to talk about it and to seek support. If you need a health care provider, call the Center for Multicultural Health at (206) 461-6910. Find more local resources for families living with memory loss at doh.wa.gov/memory.


Post copy: When memory loss disrupts your daily life, it's time to get checked out. The same goes for changes in your ability to think. Maybe you're forgetting new information or repeating questions. Maybe you have trouble making plans, solving problems or concentrating. Don't ignore the signs. Early detection of dementia or other health problems can make a big difference. Learn more at doh.wa.gov/memory.

Latinx Community

Social Media Graphics

Click an image to download it.

 

 

Post copy: Families take care of one another, including when they have health problems. If your spouse, parent or someone else you care about is showing signs of memory loss, talk with them about it. Help them make a doctor’s appointment to get checked out. Learn more at doh.wa.gov/memory.


Post copy: Getting your memory checked should be part of your overall health care, like getting checked for high blood pressure or diabetes. Have you noticed signs of memory loss in yourself or in a family member? Talk about it, and get it checked out by a health care provider. Learn more at doh.wa.gov/memory.


Post copy: If you have memory loss, it’s better to know the reason as soon as you can. Your doctor can tell you about lifestyle changes or medications that could help. And there are many resources and programs to support individuals and families. If you notice memory loss in yourself or a relative, it's time to talk with your family and a doctor. Learn more at doh.wa.gov/memory.


Post copy: If you or a family member has memory loss, you're not alone. Our community has resources and organizations that support families coping with memory loss. But it's important to talk with a doctor and to start getting support soon. Learn about memory loss at doh.wa.gov/memory.

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