Community Dementia Education Resources

A series of resources are available for available for Black/African American and Latinx/Hispanic communities in Washington state to download and use for dementia education and community awareness. They're free and available for local partners, faith-based organizations, healthcare providers, media outlets and everyone else.

The Washington State Department of Health is actively working to develop materials that are tailored to different communities in our state and will continue to add more materials as resources are available. 

Black/African American Community

Videos


Understanding Memory Loss - 0:33 (YouTube)


Understanding Memory Loss Spokesperson Connie Thompson - 2:14 (YouTube)


Understanding Memory Loss Spokesperson George Dicks - 2:29 (YouTube)

Brochures
Newsletter Articles
Social Media Graphics

Click an image to download it.

Post copy: Early detection can make a big difference if you have dementia. Your health care provider can tell you about lifestyle changes or medications that could help. And there are many resources and programs to support individuals and families. If you notice memory loss in yourself or a relative, it's time to talk with your family and your health care provider. Learn more at doh.wa.gov/memory.


Post copy: If you or a family member has signs of memory loss, now is the time to talk about it. Listen carefully to each other, with compassion. And agree on your next steps together, starting with a call to your health care provider for an appointment. Learn more at doh.wa.gov/memory.


Post copy: Some memory loss is just part of aging. But memory loss that disrupts daily life could be a sign of something more serious and should be checked out by your health care provider. Don't ignore signs of memory loss or new problems related to thinking, whether they're in yourself or a family member. Learn more about possible signs of dementia at doh.wa.gov/memory.


Post copy: If you or a family member has memory loss or signs of dementia, you're not alone. But it's important to talk about it and to seek support. If you need a health care provider, call the Center for Multicultural Health at (206) 461-6910. Find more local resources for families living with memory loss at doh.wa.gov/memory.


Post copy: When memory loss disrupts your daily life, it's time to get checked out. The same goes for changes in your ability to think. Maybe you're forgetting new information or repeating questions. Maybe you have trouble making plans, solving problems or concentrating. Don't ignore the signs. Early detection of dementia or other health problems can make a big difference. Learn more at doh.wa.gov/memory.

Latinx Community

Videos


Comprendiendo la Pérdida de Memoria (Understanding Memory Loss) - 0:37 (YouTube)

Comprendiendo la Pérdida de Memoria (Understanding Memory Loss) | Estela Ochoa - 2:32 (YouTube)

Comprendiendo la Pérdida de Memoria (Understanding Memory Loss) | Yanin Diaz - 2:37 (YouTube)

Brochure

English

Spanish

Newsletter Articles

English

Spanish

Social Media Graphics

Click an image to download it.

 

 

Post copy: Families take care of one another, including when they have health problems. If your spouse, parent or someone else you care about is showing signs of memory loss, talk with them about it. Help them make a doctor’s appointment to get checked out. Learn more at doh.wa.gov/memory.


Post copy: Getting your memory checked should be part of your overall health care, like getting checked for high blood pressure or diabetes. Have you noticed signs of memory loss in yourself or in a family member? Talk about it, and get it checked out by a health care provider. Learn more at doh.wa.gov/memory.


Post copy: If you have memory loss, it’s better to know the reason as soon as you can. Your doctor can tell you about lifestyle changes or medications that could help. And there are many resources and programs to support individuals and families. If you notice memory loss in yourself or a relative, it's time to talk with your family and a doctor. Learn more at doh.wa.gov/memory.


Post copy: If you or a family member has memory loss, you're not alone. Our community has resources and organizations that support families coping with memory loss. But it's important to talk with a doctor and to start getting support soon. Learn about memory loss at doh.wa.gov/memory.

Spanish:

Texto social 1: Las familias se cuidan unas a otras, incluso cuando tienen problemas de salud. Si su cónyuge, su padre o su madre, o cualquier otra persona a la que aprecie, muestra signos de pérdida de memoria, hable con ellos al respecto. Ayúdele a pedir una cita con un médico para que le examine. Más información en doh.wa.gov/memory.


Texto social 2: Hacerse un chequeo de la memoria debería ser una parte normal del cuidado de la salud en general, tal cual como hacerse un chequeo de la presión arterial alta o de la diabetes. ¿Ha notado signos de pérdida de memoria en usted o en algún familiar? Hable de ello y haga que le evalúe un profesional de la salud. Más información en doh.wa.gov/memory.


Texto social 3: Si sufre de pérdida de memoria, es mejor conocer el motivo lo antes posible. Su médico puede informarle sobre los cambios en su estilo de vida o los medicamentos que podrían ayudarle. Y existen muchos recursos y programas que brindan apoyo a las personas y las familias. Si nota una pérdida de memoria en usted o en un familiar, este es el momento de hablar con su familia y con un médico. Más información en doh.wa.gov/memory.


Texto social 4: Si usted o un miembro de su familia sufre de pérdida de memoria, no está solo. Nuestra comunidad cuenta con recursos y organizaciones que apoyan a las familias que se enfrentan a la pérdida de memoria. Pero es importante hablar con un médico y empezar a recibir apoyo pronto. Infórmese sobre la pérdida de memoria en doh.wa.gov/memory.

Return to Dementia Homepage